Sep 07 2015

The Future of the University

Category: JournalsBob Hanke @ 9:20 am

Perspectives for the New University

The new issue of Krisis, Journal for Contemporary Philosophy deals with the future of the university. The desire for a special issue on this topic was provoked by the Maagdenhuis protest at the University of Amsterdam in the early spring of 2015. The energy of surprise and enthusiasm released by the protests, the fact that direct and confrontational action “worked”, that it was even taken seriously and responded to, seemed to open up new horizons. We strove to capture some of the imaginative energy that was released by these events.

The issue is organized along three points of focus: struggles, diagnoses and futures. Under the heading of struggles, the reader will find contributions that not only describe specific fights taking place but also be able to sense the passion and engagement. Diagnoses deal with the problem at hand. What is actually the problem and how can we grasp it in such a way that we do not argue ourselves into passivity? Finally, there are contributions which explicitly propose future images of the university, both in terms of structure and organization as well as alternative concepts and callings.

To download this special issue, go to:

http://www.krisis.eu/content/2015-2/Krisis-2015-2-complete-issue.pdf

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Jul 05 2015

CUPE 3908 Call for Presenters: Academic Precarity Symposium

Category: ConferencesBob Hanke @ 11:54 am

Challenging Academic Precarity

October 2-4, 2015 Artspace, Peterborough ON

Academia has long been heralded as the ivory tower to which we all should aspire and those that are admitted are thought to be well compensated. With the prevailing winds of neoliberalism blowing at the doors, the corporatization of the university has witnessed the reduction of tenured faculty positions. At the same time, increasing resources have been assigned to professional administration. The result is that more and more full-time academics are paid part-time wages and forced to endure precarity when alternatives abound.

This interdisciplinary symposium seeks to situate and understand how these trends emerged and continue to develop. The first two days will feature a keynote address, roundtables and panel discussions. The final day will be an exploration of avenues for future intervention and activism.

We seek proposals for the following possible subject matter:

* Political economy of ‘just in time’ academic labour
* Forms of resistance and protest
* Engaging tenured & tenure-track faculty
* Student academic workers’ plight
* Mobilization strategies
* Challenging precarity with art
* Movement to zero tuition

We welcome diverse proposals and formats including, but not limited to, full panel proposals, multimedia presentations, artistic interventions, and, of course, more conventional academic papers.Please send all abstracts and/or presentation proposals in either .rtf, .docx, or .pdf formats to office@cupe3908.org by August 25th, 2015. Please limit your proposal to no more than 250 words. Notifications will be sent out by September 1, 2015. Please send all other inquiries to: James Onusko at vp1@cupe3908.org

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Dec 08 2012

The University to Come

Category: JournalsBob Hanke @ 10:01 pm

TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies

Out of the Ruins, the University to Come

Number Twenty-eight — Fall 2012

Guest edited by Bob Hanke (York University) and Alison Hearn (University of Western Ontario)

Contents
______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Memorial: Roger I. Simon
Jody Berland, Blake Fitzpatrick, Henry Giroux, Deborah Britzman

Introduction: Out of the Ruins, the University to Come
Bob Hanke and Alison Hearn

Articles

Struggling Universities: Simon Fraser University and the Crisis of Canadian Public Education
Edna Brophy and Myka Tucker-Abramson

Academic Feminism’s Entanglements with University Corporatization
Janice Newson

University Branding Via Securitization
Julie Gregory

Beyond Academic Freedom: Canadian Neoliberal Universities in the Global Context
Sandra Jeppesen and Holly Nazar

Reconfiguring the Academic Dance: A Critique of Faculty’s Responses to Administrative Practices in Canadian Universities
Claire Polster

Knowledge Mediators and Lubricating Channels: On the Temporal Politics of Remissioning the University
Filip Vostal and Susan Robertson

Offerings

Circulation and the New University
Brian Whitener and Dan Nemser

The Scholarly Affair is Self-Love
Paul Magee

The University, the Media and the Politics of Voice
Sean Phelan

The University System: Alienation or Emancipation?
Éric George

Social Science Research and the Creation of Publics
Nick Mahony

David F. Noble 1945–2010: An Appreciation
Wade Rowland

Gallery

Gallery of Voices and Images from the Maple Spring
Nicolas Quiazua, Rushdia Mehreen, Rosalind Hampton, Lilian Radovac, Laurence Guénette, Matthew Brett, Natassia Williams, Kevin Paul, CLASSE, Chicoutimi, Linda McQuaig, Frédéric Faddoul, Yvan Perrier and Guy Rocher

Review Essays

The Neo-University
Ross Eaman

University Professors: Recurring Issues Revisited
Kenneth-Roy Bonin

Beyond the Knowledge Factory?
Ian Angus

From the Arab Spring to the Maple Spring: National Student Protests Graduate to Transnational Social Movements
Lena Palacios

The Academy and the Politics of Exchange: A Network for The Public Good
David N. Wright

Reviews

Hard Times: The Impacts of Neoliberal Hegemony on Academic Culture
Patricia Hughes-Fuller

Topos of Faith: Derrida’s Counter-institutions
Joshua Synenko

The Need for Care and Attention in the Face of Psychopower
Margrit Talpalaru

Stalking through the Academy
Robert Pike

The University and a New Definition of Enlightenment
Maria Victoria Guglietti

The Perils of “Research Capitalism”
Michael Cottrell

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Sep 19 2012

The Combustible University

Category: News,Online Publication,StudentsBob Hanke @ 6:57 pm

The Combustible Campus: From Montreal to Mexico City, Something is Stirring in the University

By Enda Brophy

(excerpted from Briarpatch Magazine, Sept 1, 2012)

For three decades now, the neoliberal restructuring of post-secondary education has sought to implant market logic and corporate-style management into the academy. The systematic defunding of public education that enables this process has only intensified in recent years with the global financial crisis and the austerity measures imposed in its wake. The resulting transformation of public university systems has brought us corporatized administrations, rising tuition, departmental closures, expanded class sizes, noxious corporate food, offensives against academic workers, and ethically dubious corporate donations.

In its current form, one could argue that the academy produces little that extends our collective social capacities and much that diminishes them: hierarchy, exploitation, debt, individualism, precarious employment, and cynicism. At a time when knowledge is increasingly seen as a commodity to be produced in accordance with the demands of profit, and public education is decried as an unjust fetter on the ruthless pedagogy of the free market, the private sector has turned its attention to the university and is fervently dedicated to its transformation. The state has mostly obliged, with centre-right and centre-left governments across the world taking turns at accelerating this epochal shift in post-secondary education.

And yet, something is stirring in the university. From London to Montreal, from Santiago to Auckland, from Wisconsin to Mexico City, struggles against the commodification of knowledge are proliferating. The neoliberalization of the university has produced its own antagonists, and it is from the ranks of those who stand to lose the most from this transformation – students and academic workers – that the greatest conflicts have emanated.

To read the rest of this article, click here.

 

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